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Canary

The Atlantic canary (Serinus canaria), known worldwide simply as the wild canary and also called the island canary, canary, or common canary, is a small passerine bird belonging to the genus Serinus in the finch family, Fringillidae. It is native to the Canary Islands, the Azores, and Madeira. Wild birds are mostly yellow-green, with brownish streaking on the back. The species is common in captivity and a number of colour varieties have been bred.
Distribution
Originally they come from Canary Islands
Feeding
mainly granivorous feed

Pink cardinal

CITES
It mainly lives in bushy places
Distribution
Feeding
Grains

Tawny owl

The tawny owl or brown owl (Strix aluco) is a stocky, medium-sized owl commonly found in woodlands across much of Eurasia. Its underparts are pale with dark streaks, and the upperparts are either brown or grey. Several of the eleven recognised subspecies have both variants. The nest is typically in a tree hole where it can protect its eggs and young against potential predators
CITES
Appendix II, attached A
Distribution
The tawny owl has a distribution stretching discontinuously across temperate Eurasia
Feeding
Mainly woodland rodents, but also other mammals up to the size of a young rabbit, and birds, earthworms and beetles

Galah

Is one of the most common and widespread cockatoos, and it can be found in open country in almost all parts of mainland Australia. Galahs are about 35 cm (14 in) long and weigh 270–350 g. They have a pale silver to mid-grey back, a pale grey rump, a pink face and chest, and a light pink mobile crest. They have a bone-coloured beak, and the bare skin of the eye rings is carunculated. They have grey legs. The sexes appear similar, however generally adult birds differ in the colour of the irises; the male has very dark brown (almost black) irises and the female has mid-brown or red irises.
CITES
Appendix II, attached B
Distribution
They are found in all Australian states
Feeding
Seeds, grasses, small insects, shoots and roots

Ara ararauna

The blue-and-yellow macaw (Ara ararauna), also known as the blue-and-gold macaw, is a large South American parrot with blue top parts and yellow under parts. They are popular in aviculture because of their striking color, ability to talk, ready availability in the marketplace, and close bonding to humans. These birds can reach a length of 76–86 cm (30–34 in) and weigh 0.900–1.5 kg (2–3 lb), making them some of the larger members of their family.
CITES
Appendix II, attached B
Distribution
This species occurs in Venezuela, Peru, Brazil, Bolivia, and Paraguay. The range extends slightly into Central America, where it is restricted to Panama
Feeding
Fruits, seeds, berries